Other Funding Sources

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Grantmakers

The SSRC is an international organization whose mission is to nurture new generations of social scientists, foster innovative research, and mobilize necessary knowledge on important public issues. It has over 30 fellowship and grant programs, many of interest to anthropologists. In particular, the International Dissertation Research Fellowship supports dissertation research conducted, in whole or in part, outside the United States, about non-US topics and is open to graduate students in the humanities and social sciences – regardless of citizenship – enrolled in Ph.D. programs in the United States.

The Spencer Foundation supports research that promises to yield new knowledge about education in the United States or abroad and how it can be improved. The Foundation's Research programs support work that shows promise of contributing new knowledge or understanding that may contribute to improvement of educational thought or practice. Spencer Fellowship programs support educational researchers at different stages of their professional careers, providing resources to both beginning and senior researchers to pursue concentrated intellectual activity.

The SRI Foundation is dedicated to cultural resource management (CRM). The Foundation has two $10,000 Dissertation Research Grants for advanced doctoral candidates in historic preservation. The Foundation also runs a summer institute for professional development in CRM.

The SRF is a joint fund of the Linnean Society and the Systematics Association which administers grants annually for small-scale research projects in the field of systematics and taxonomy. Contributions are typically made towards fieldwork expenditure, the purchase of scientific equipment or expertise, specimen preparation, and publication costs. Projects of a more general or educational nature will also be considered, provided that they include a strong systematics component.

The Toyota Foundation seeks to contribute to the development of better societies that will foster rich relationships among people and between people and nature. It provides a variety of funding opportunities, most significantly the International Grant Program, the Research Grant Program, and Grant Program for Community Activities in Japan.

The Trudeau Scholarship is the most prestigious doctoral award in Canada. Available to Canadian citizens and non-citizens who are enrolled at a Canadian institution, the scholarship is valued at $60,000 per year for a maximum of four years. A link to one or more of the Foundation themes is a basic requirement for the Trudeau Scholarship. The Trudeau Foundation’s themes are Human Rights and Dignity, Responsible Citizenship, Canada in the World, and People in their Natural Environment.

The United States Institute of Peace is an independent, nonpartisan institution whose mission is to strengthen the nation's capacity to promote the peaceful resolution of international conflict. The Jennings Randolph Peace Scholarship program supports doctoral dissertations that explore the sources and nature of international conflict, and strategies to prevent conflict and/or sustain peace. The Jennings Randolph Senior Fellowship program permits scholars to be in residence at the Institute in Washington D.C. for up to 10 months. The Institute offers other fellowship opportunities including the Trans-Atlantic Post-Doc Fellowship for Institutional Relations and Security (TAPIR).

Academic, independent, and museum scholars, as well as advanced graduate students are invited to apply for short and long-term residential research fellowships. Research fellows conduct research in many areas of social and cultural history, including material culture, architecture, decorative arts, design, consumer culture, garden and landscape studies, Shaker studies, travel and tourism, the Atlantic World, and objects in literature. Winterthur's collections are rich and diverse, and we welcome applications that offer fresh approaches to our resources.

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation prepares the nation’s best minds to meet its most important challenges, working through education. It administers fellowships for doctoral students and faculty members that are divided into specific program areas. In addition, the foundation provides dissertation grants for research dealing in ethics, religious questions, and women's issues.

WWF established the Russell E. Train Education for Nature Program to provide financial support to proven and potential conservation leaders in Africa, Asia, and Latin America to gain the needed knowledge and skills to address the conservation issues in their home countries. The program offers four initiatives as a means of raising awareness for worldwide conservation: Russell E. Train Fellowships, EFN Professional Development Grants, EFN Conservation Workshop Grants, and EFN Alumni Grants.