Sharangpani, Mukta

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Stanford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 22, 2004
Project Title: 
Sharangpani, Mukta, Stanford U., Stanford, CA - To aid 'Kin-figurations: An Examination of Domestic Violence, Class, and Kinship in Mumbai,' supervised by Dr. Akhil Gupta

MUKTA SHARANGPANI, then a student at Stanford University, Stanford, California was awarded a grant in July 2004 to aid 'Kin-figurations: An Examination of Domestic Violence, Class, and Kinship in Mumbai,' supervised by Dr. Akhil Gupta. This project suggests that while domestic violence transcends class, it is perceived, experienced, negotiated and lived in very specific ways by members of different classes. This project focuses on the conditions that create a space that is ripe for acts of violence, rather than simply focusing on explicit enactments of violence. As such, it provides a solid analytical framework for formulating grassroots and policy level solutions that are not simply 'rescue' based, but rather nuanced and oriented towards the complex and contradictory experiences of aggression and violence. Finally, by viewing violence along the axes of kinship and class, this project contests the notion of collective rights and highlights the need to locate family violence (and violence in general) within multiple fields of power and inequity.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$24,400

Chang, Abdul Haque

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, El Paso, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 11, 2012
Project Title: 
Chang, Abdul Haque, U. of Texas, Austin, TX - To aid research on ''Voices of Fishermen of the Indus Delta in National Water Governance and Environmental Narratives',' supervised by Dr. Kamran Asdar Ali

Preliminary abstract: This study will focus on how since Pakistan's independence in 194, irrigation systems, dam building, and water management in the Upper Punjab area have affected the lives of the Indus Delta's fishing community. Through an ethnographic study of three sites--Doulat Dablo, Keti Bandar, and Rehri Goth in the southern province of Sindh--I seek to document how the Delta population and the landscape has changed due to the implementation of the existing water management practices. Hence, this research will closely examine how state-sponsored projects initiated for 'the greater good' have ended up in sidelining the Delta fisher-folk community who have historically depended on the Indus water for their sustenance and livelihoods.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$18,000

Lyon, Margot L.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 25, 2001
Project Title: 
Lyon, Dr. Margot L., Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid research on 'New Maladies of Self and Society in a Changing Javanese Social and Economic Order'
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$19,450

Mahadev, Neena

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Johns Hopkins U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 24, 2008
Project Title: 
Mahadev, Neena, Johns Hopkins U., Baltimore, MD - To aid research on 'Buddhist and Christian Ethical Endeavors: Charitable Works, Conversions, and Unstable Religious Commitments in Post-Tsunami Sri Lanka,' supervised by Dr. Veena Das

NEENA MAHADEV, then a student at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, was awarded funding in October 2008, to aid research on 'Buddhist and Christian Ethical Endeavors: Charitable Works, Conversions, and Unstable Religious Commitments in Post-Tsunami Sri Lanka,' supervised by Dr. Veena Das. The rise in global Pentecostal Christianity has begun to affect Sri Lanka over recent decades, inciting Buddhist nationalists to revive their efforts to protect against the possibility that Christianity will supplant Buddhism as the majority religion of the country. This research attended to the discourses and practices involved in protecting Theravada Buddhism, as well as to new practices of evangelism and charismatic Christianity in Sri Lanka. The fieldwork considered sub/urban religious landscapes where conversions to charismatic Christianity have been relatively concentrated within certain socioeconomic demographic groups, in contrast to predominantly Buddhist tsunami-affected areas where conversions have been gradual, limited, and dispersed across southern districts. In the crosscut between Buddhist nationalism and Pentecostal evangelism in Sri Lanka, this project took up the following ethnographic tasks: 1) to study the events that have caused a resurgence of exclusivist religious doctrines and practices, exacerbating Buddhist-Christian discord in Sri Lanka; 2) to study the impacts of heightened tensions on Buddhist and Christian institutions and individuals; 3) to gain knowledge about the workings of both harmonious and discordant inter-religious relationships; and 4) to understand how experiences of belonging within families and within village communities did or did not match ideologies of exclusivity promoted by religious authorities.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Huang, Shu-min

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Iowa State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 9, 2004
Project Title: 
Huang, Dr. Shu-min, Iowa State U., Ames, IA; and Rakariyatham, Dr. Pong-In, Chiang Mai U., Chiang Mai, Thailand - To aid collaboration on Chinese diasporic communities in highland northern Thailand: ecology, identity, and transnationalism

DR. SHU-MIN HUANG, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, and DR. PONG-IN RAKARIYATHAM, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, received a renewal of an International Collaborative Research Grant in April 2004 to aid research on Chinese diasporic communities in highland northern Thailand: ecology, identity, and transnationalism. This is the second year of a multidisciplinary (i.e., anthropology, geography, and soil sciences) and multinational (China, Hong Kong, Thailand, and the U.S.) project sponsored by Wenner-Gren's International Collaborative Research Program. Besides conducting fieldwork in Banmai Nongbua, including participatory living by ethnographers in the village and experimental sampling by natural scientists in its vicinity, this year also includes formal paper presentations of preliminary findings at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropologists in November 2004. Besides this formal panel presentation, this year's project has produced one M.A. thesis (Duan Ying of the Chinese University of Hong Kong) and three professional articles (all by Huang in: Ethnology and Taiwan Journal of Anthropology and an edited volume by Professor C.B. Tan). Future products on the drawing board include one book-length monograph (by Huang), a conference paper (Huang and Panomtarinichigul), and, hopefully, an ethnographic film (Yang).

Publication Credit:

Kiamg. Shu-min. 2005. The Articulation of Culture, Agriculture, and the Environment of Chinese in Northern Thailand. Ethnology 64(1):1-12.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$28,505

Sternberg, Troy

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
September 5, 2014
Project Title: 
Sternberg, Dr. Troy, U. of Oxford, Oxford, UK - To aid workshop on 'Localities and Livelihoods in Asian Drylands: Pastoralism in an Era of Climatic, Economic, and Social Change,' 2015, U. of Oxford, in collaboration with Ms. Ariell Ahearn-Ligham

Preliminary abstract: The workshop, Localities and Livelihoods in Asian Drylands, aims to build the capacity of native scholars that work on pastoralism and society in Asian drylands and to examine the related themes of agency, risk, and boundaries as they pertain to the wider fields of anthropology and human geography and push forward new and relevant theory in these substantive areas. The unique incubator will strengthen interaction and collaboration of Asian scholars working on issues related to the anthropology of pastoralist peoples in dryland environments. Participants will focus on improving academic writing and communication skills through contributing papers to a rigorous peer-review and mentoring process involving one-on-one support by established anthropologists. This process will occur in tandem with discussion, article preparation and presentation on the themes of agency, risk and boundaries. The outcome of this programme will form a special journal issue. 'Localities and Livelihoods' has the potential to make a great impact through the development of local anthropological scholars and expanded discourse on Asian drylands. It will bookend the Oxford Desert Conference to provide four days of focused work sessions in combination with many opportunites to present to a wider audience of interdisciplianry and international scholars.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$18,943

Closser, Svea Hupy

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Emory U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Closser, Svea Hupy, Emory U., Atlanta, GA - To aid research on 'Global Development in Policy and Practice: The Polio Eradication Initiative from Atlanta to Rural Pakistan,' supervised by Dr. Peter John Brown

SVEA CLOSSER then a student at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, received funding in May 2006 to aid research on 'Global Development in Policy and Practice: The Polio Eradication Initiative from Atlanta to Rural Pakistan,' supervised by Dr. Peter J. Brown. This case study of a public health project focused on Pakistan, one of the last four countries in the world with endemic polio, and explored the reach, limits, and complex negotiation of the power of UN and bilateral agencies over the Pakistani health system. This research revealed that because the Polio Eradication Initiative is a 'partnership' of donors and UN agencies with country governments, officials at places like the WHO in Geneva have no direct control over the actual implementation of immunization activities. Polio vaccination campaigns are carried out in Pakistan by highly political district health offices along with very poorly paid and largely disgruntled workers. The WHO uses a number of tactics to put pressure on Pakistani government officials, but they are unable to make polio the priority in a nation beset with other, more politically pressing problems. However, due to the donor-directed culture of optimism that pervades upper levels of the project, these issues are never discussed in official publications. These tensions between the culture of global health institutions and local political cultures threaten to undermine the 20-year, six-billion-dollar initiative.

Publication Credit:

Closser, Svea. 2010. Chasing Polio in Pakistan: Why the World's Largest Public Health Initiative May Fail. Vanderbilt University Press: Nashville, TN.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$22,716

Mojaddedi, Fatima

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 19, 2012
Project Title: 
Mojaddedi, Fatima, Columbia U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'The War Bubble: Kabul's Shifting Warscape and Afghan-American Community,' supervised by Dr. Rosalind Carmel Morris

Preliminary abstract: This project examines Kabul as a frontier in an international economy of war profiteering and considers how it has transformed in the interactions of space, war and transnational diaspora activity. I focus on the crucial role of the repatriated Afghan-American community in mediating Kabul's booming war economy and property market. Seeking to illustrate how diverse social actors enable and mediate urban militarization, I will trace a range of transformative local effects in key sites of socio-urban transformation in Kabul that exemplify broader processes of urban militarization and social enclaving. These discrepant spaces overlap to provide a landscape that shapes various understandings and experiences of war. Thus, my dissertation asks: How has the war reconfigured Kabul's socio-spatial and urban landscape? What role does Kabul's speculative property market and repatriated Afghan-American community play? How does segregated social space effect how local and foreign residents live in Kabul? My project builds on several broad literatures while insisting on the importance of Kabul's particular socio-cultural and economic topography; studying the ways in which Kabul's urban 'warscape' is forged by spatial relations of militarized control that hinge on overlapping social and economic relations.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$17,940

Junaid, Mohamad

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Graduate Center, City U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2014
Project Title: 
Junaid, Mohamad, City U. of New York, Graduate Center, New York, NY - To aid research on 'Urban Kashmiri Youth Activists: State Violence, Tehreek, and the Formation of Political Subjectivity,' supervised by Dr. Vincent Crapanzano

Preliminary abstract: Youth in Indian-controlled Kashmir's capital, Srinagar, live under conditions of chronic state violence, yet have been able to renew the long-standing Kashmiri movement for self-determination, locally known by its Urdu name Tehreek. Legally, Kashmiris are full citizens in India, but since 1990, India has used emergency laws and militarized governance to punitively contain Kashmiris. Kashmiri youth activists, who have spent most of their lives under these conditions, are, in particular, stigmatized and subjected to violence. The renewal of the Tehreek since 2008, mostly in the form of non-violent protests, has led to further state repression, but the movement has continued. However, an increasing emphasis on transnational Islamic politics, which challenges the traditional nationalist framings of self-determination, and an emerging articulation of young Kashmiri women's struggles within the Tehreek have turned the latter into a wider space for internal contestation. By ethnographically focusing on urban Kashmiri youth activists, my research will examine how youth sense everyday precarity under state domination, become committed to politics, and the implications of their emergent transnational discourse on the self-determination movement. Further documenting the experiences and perspectives of young Kashmiri women activists, I will analyze the consequences of differences within political movements in subordinated societies.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$18,960

Tidwell, Tawni Lynn

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Emory U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2012
Project Title: 
Tidwell, Tawni Lynn, Emory U., Atlanta, GA - To aid research on 'Transmitting Diagnostic Skills in Tibetan Medicine: Embodied Practices for Indigenous Categories of Cancer,' supervised by Dr. Carol Worthman

Preliminary abstract: Tibetan medical diagnostics for indigenous categories of cancer provide a lens for understanding embodied expertise among Tibetan physicians. This diagnostic repertoire is comprised of pulse diagnosis, urinalysis and other embodied practices of illness recognition trained in tactile and sensory capacities of the physician. This investigation of Tibetan medical diagnosis as it is formally transmitted, cultivated, and clinically deployed, will track the system in action and open a gateway to understanding the epistemological underpinnings of Tibetan conceptions of pathology and treatment. The focus on cancer is strategic: as the nosological categories in which Tibetan medical and western biomedical systems most closely overlap, it opens a space for analyzing features of the two systems for diagnosis and care. As the first western student in the premier Tibetan medical school, this investigator will work with students, faculty and expert physicians to document how diagnostic skills are transmitted, cultivated and applied, with particular regard to cancer. This project is poised to contribute substantive insights into distinctive ways of 'reading' and caring for the body, the place for embodied practices in medical expertise, the significance of knowledge transmission processes for embodied skill, and the role of such skills in translating formal knowledge domains into application.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,115
Syndicate content