Enfield, Nicholas James

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Max Planck Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Enfield, Dr. Nicholas James, Max Planck Institute, Nijmegen, The Netherlands - To aid workshop on 'Dynamics of Human Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia,' 2009, Siem Reap, Cambodia, in collaboration with Dr. Joyce Carol White

'Dynamics of Human Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia'
January 7-10, 2009, Siem Reap, Cambodia
Organizers: Nicholas Enfield (Max Planck Instittute, Nijmegen) and Joyce White (University of Pennsylvania Museum)

This four-field meeting brought together an international group of linguists, social/cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, and physical/biological anthropologists, to address the following question: What is the nature of human diversity in mainland Southeast Asia, and how did it come to be this way? The focus of discussions was restricted spatially to
mainland Southeast Asia (centrally, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and the Malay Peninsula) and temporally to the Holocene (the last 11,000 years). Drawing upon exciting new developments in all sub-fields of anthropology in this area, scholars from different disciplines came together to update one another on the states of their respective arts, as well
as to identify new syntheses and new agendas for interdisciplinary research. Issues of homeland of ethnolinguistic groups, and of timing of migrations (especially of the Asian groups of peninsular Malaysia and Thailand, and more generally the Austroasiatic language family), were illuminated by considering different kinds of evidence from the most recent
research in historical linguistics, archaeology, and especially the latest results from bioarchaeology and genetics. None of the biggest questions were definitively solved, but the meeting succeeded in bringing all participants further along in the search for solutions, as well as forging some new scholarly relationships with the potential for future interdisciplinary collaborations.

Publication credit:

Enfield, N.J. 2011. Linguistic Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia. In Dynamics of Human Diversity: The Case of Mainland Southeast Asia. Pacific Linguistics. School of Culture, History and Language. College of Asia and the Pacific. The Australian National University: Canberra.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Greenberg, James B.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 8, 2003
Project Title: 
Greenberg, Dr. James B., U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology Oral History Project
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$9,381

Kattan, Shlomy

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Kattan, Shlomy, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid 'Language Socialization and Language Ideologies among Israeli Emissaries: A Global Ethnography of Transnationalism,' supervised by Dr. Sahara Patricia Baquedano-Lopez

SHLOMY KATTAN, then a student at University of California, Berkeley, California, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Language Socialization and Language ideologies among Israeli Emissaries: A Global Ethnography of Transnationalism,' supervised by Dr. Sahara Patricia Baquedano-Lopez. This multi-sited ethnography examines language socialization, linguistic ideologies, and identity practices amongst families of Israeli emissaries and their young children, following their transition from Israel, through their residence in New York, and until their return to Israel after two years. During the first funded year of research, observations, interviews, and audio and video recording have been carried out in both countries at home and in school. In-home observations capture the methods used to socialize children to being bilingual, record family conversations about Israel and New York, and document changes in participants' language use. In-school observations document changes ininteractional practices between the focal children, their teachers, and peers. Observations document how focal children enter into and form social groups, how they negotiate their position as language learners and as non-locals, and how they utilize their changing linguistic skills. The data provide empirical support that the transition and socialization of the children are negotiated across sites, and illustrate how such negotiations take place across the sites. Socialization practices are not positivistic or objective, but rather derive rom participants' changing ideologies vis-à-vis children's abilities in English and Hebrew, as well as their perceptions of the children's fluctuating needs in those languages.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$23,343

McComsey, Melanie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Diego, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2011
Project Title: 
McComsey, Melanie, U. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA - To aid research on 'Bilingual Spaces: Socialization to Spatialized Practice in Spanish and Juchitán Zapotec,' supervised by Dr. John B. Haviland

Preliminary abstract: How do bilingual children conceptualize and verbalize spatial information relative to monolinguals, and how are they socialized to particular spatialized practices? This project will address this central question, exploring spatial language use among a particular group of bilingual children, the effects of language contact on their communication about space, and the implications of these effects for language change. The research will take place Juchitán, a city of 71,000 people located in Oaxaca, Mexico, where residents are mostly bilingual speakers of Spanish and the local indigenous language, Juchitán Zapotec. Some scholars, however, have argued that Juchitán has begun a process of language shift from Zapotec to Spanish. In light of these claims, I hypothesize that the competing language systems of Spanish and Zapotec will be associated with competing gestural-conceptual systems. Furthermore, I hypothesize that young bilingual speakers of Spanish and Zapotec will be socialized to use their gestural-conceptual system in different ways--relating acts of spatial orientation to the physical and interactional context differently--and that this will have implications for the children's communicative competence in each language. This project will employ a combination of participant observation associated with 'microethnography' and elicitation tasks derived from linguistics and cognitive science. This theoretical intersection of spatial language, bodily communication, and bilingual acquisition represents a burgeoning area of research that is wide open for original, creative scholarship, but that nonetheless is rooted in many of the core questions about language, thought, and culture long of fascination to linguistic anthropologists.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$9,420

Ruby, Jay

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 31, 2010
Project Title: 
Ruby, Dr. Jay, Temple U., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - To aid preparation of the Jay Ruby Visual Anthropology Papers for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$5,500

Bashkow, Ira R.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Virginia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Bashkow, Dr. Ira, U. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA - To aid oral-history interviews with Dr. J. David Sapir
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$1,200

Universidad Nacional de Cordoba

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cordoba, National U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina - Institutional Development Grant

The Museum of Anthropology of Córdoba, Argentina, supported by the IDG of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, will develop a doctoral program to prepare professionals for research and academic education in Anthropological Sciences, with specialized training in the three classic sub-areas of research: Social Anthropology, Archaeology and Bioanthropology. The Museum will also benefit from collaborations with the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology of the University of Kansas, the Department of Anthropology of the University of Wyoming and Postgraduate Program in Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil the Museum.

The Doctoral program will focus on intensive theoretical and practical training to produce professionals who will be able to undertake independent research projects, exercise leadership of scientific research teams, communicate their research results, and teach at the university. It is hoped that through this program the students will also acquire various experiences in diverse academic contexts and form external relationship which will open possibilities for exchange and dialogue with other anthropologists, while generating their own future networks. It is hoped that this would impact positively on their education and in their personal and institutional performance.

The existence of a Postgraduate Program in Anthropological Sciences at Córdoba opens up the possibility of continuity in the training of graduate students and their integration into the teaching and research activities. This in turn will provide more opportunities for graduates of other neighboring Argentina provinces, where there is no such possibility of postgraduate training. This also will extend the possibilities of bringing the practice of anthropology to non academic realms, responding to a continuous growing demand in the region.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Engelbrecht, Beate

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Gottingen, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 23, 2001
Project Title: 
Engelbrecht, Dr. Beate, Institute for Scientific Research, Goettingen, Germany - To aid conference on origins of visual anthropology: putting the past together, 2000, IWF- Institute for Scientific Film, in collaboration with Dr. Rolf Husmann
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Hall, Jennifer Lee

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Hall, Jennifer Lee, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Building Bridges: Language Ideology and Passerelle Literacy Education in Morocco,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine

JENNIFER L. HALL, then a student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'Building Bridges: Language Ideology and Passerelle Literacy Education in Morocco,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine. This dissertation research looks at mother tongue adult literacy education in Morocco through a case study of a new methodology called 'passerelle.' The grantee tested the hypothesis that passerelle -- by promoting Standard Arabic script as an ideologically neutral instrument for representing mother tongue languages -- presents an ideological conflict for learners and educators who may hold differing ideas as to the appropriateness of portraying traditionally oral languages in written form using Arabic script. Twelve months of comparative research was conducted on the ideologies of learners and educators in passerelle classrooms, in both urban and rural settings. The grantee observed that passerelle literacy educators tended to avoid utilizing mother tongue literacy activities in the classroom and instead relied on normative methods of Standard Arabic literacy teaching. They restricted the use of mother tongues languages in the classroom to oral activities and the use of Standard Arabic to writing activities, thus indicating that passerelle methodology did indeed present an ideological conflict. In contrast, most adult literacy learners did not express a similar ideological conflict and embraced opportunities to write in dialectical Arabic. This is partially due to the fact that many did not hold any preconceived notions about distinctions between oral and written Arabic.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,663

Kealiinohomoku, Joann W.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
February 11, 2013
Project Title: 
Kealiinohomoku, Joann W., Flagstaff, AZ - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the Cross-Cultural Dance Resources Collection at Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$14,667
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