Rodriguez, Juan Luis

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Southern Illinois U., Carbondale
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rodriguez, Juan Luis, Southern Illinois U., Carbondale, IL - To aid research on 'Rhetorical Strategies and Gift Circulation in the Politics of The Orinoco Delta, Venezuela,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan David Hill

JUAN LUIS RODRIGUEZ, then a student at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Rhetorical Strategies and Gift Circulation in the Politics of the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan D. Hill. This study analyses political discursive strategies and gift circulation in the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela. This is a semiotic and discourse-centered study on how the Warao indigenous population interacts with political representatives from the Venezuelan government. This study is based on a yearlong fieldwork focusing on political speeches and observing how political gifts are circulated. Research focused on public political events in which politicians, governmental representatives, and communal council's members perform public political discourses. During this year, the grantee followed the constitutional referendum of December 2007 and the organization of the 2008 regional election in the Orinoco Delta, as well as the development of the Morichito communal council in the Lower Delta. This helped in evaluating how gift circulation and political discourse intersect as semiotic strategies. The purpose of this research is to further advance the discourse-centered approaches to cultures developed in South America by addressing the ways in which discursive sign vehicles interact with other semiotic forms, especially political gifts. This type of analysis is central to understand recent political processes occurring among the Warao, as well as the general political climate of Venezuela since 1998 (the rising of President Hugo Chavez Frias).

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$23,900

Baker, Brenda Jane

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 31, 2011
Project Title: 
Baker, Dr. Brenda, Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ - To aid workshop on 'Disruptions as a Cause and Consequence of Migration in Human History,' 2012, Saguaro Lake Ranch, Mesa, AZ, in collaboration with Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda

'Disruptions as a Cause and Consequence of Migration in Human History'
May 3-5, 2011, Saguaro Lake Ranch, Mesa, Arizona
Organizers: Dr. Brenda Baker & Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda (Arizona State U.)

Migration has been integral to the development of human societies since the emergence of our species and has continuously reshaped the economic, ethnic, and political dynamics of various societies over time, yet little dialogue has occurred between scholars examining contemporary and past migrations. This workshop was intended to stimulate an intellectual exchange among sociocultural anthropologists, archaeologists, bioarchaeologists, and others who study migration to analyze the extent to which environmental and social disruptions have been a cause of migration over time and whether these migratory flows have in turn led to disruptive consequences for the societies that receive them. Another goal was to help develop an understanding of common processes operating in past and present migrations. An initial conceptual framework developed by a collaborative group of faculty from Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change was circulated to workshop participants to help guide articulation with common themes and stimulate discussion. Presentations and lively discussions were geared toward developing our understanding of the relationship between disruptions and population displacements from prehistory to the present. This workshop has resulted in the submission of revised papers for publication in an edited volume.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Tavel, Aviva M

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 2, 2011
Project Title: 
Tavel, Aviva Mintz, Indianapolis, Indiana - To aid preparation of the personal research materials and film collection of Jerome Mintz for archival deposit with the Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Ellen, Roy Frank

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Kent, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 20, 2002
Project Title: 
Ellen, Dr. Roy F., U. of Kent, Canterbury, UK - To aid the Ninth Congress of Ethnobiology on ethnobiology, social change, and displacement, 2003, U. of Kent

'Ninth International Congress of Ethnobiology: Ethnobiology, Social Change and Displacement,' June 13-17, 2004, University of Kent (Canterbury, UK) -- Organizer: Dr. Roy F. Ellen (University of Kent). This was the first meeting of the Congress to be held in Europe, and brought together participants from the International Society of Ethnobiology, the Society for Economic Botany and the International Society of Ethnopharmacology. Plenary addresses were given by Brent Berlin, Arun Agrawal, Ganesan Balachander, Gerard Bodeker, Gordon Hillman, and Javier Caballero. Reflecting the theme and the location, there was special emphasis placed on the relationship between ethnobiological knowledge and socio-ecological change, population dislocation, and risk management; and on the ethnobiology of immigrant cultural minorities, the European regional traditions, and traditional minorities within Europe. Beyond these core themes, the 39 contributory panels reflected the breadth of contemporary work in the field, ranging from 'The ethnobotany of crop diversity and evolution,' to 'Ethnopharmacy and migration' and 'Ethnobiology and the sciences of humankind.'

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$14,548

Yang, Jie

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Toronto, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
January 18, 2002
Project Title: 
Yang, Jie, Beijing Language & Culture U., Beijing, China - To aid training in anthropology at U. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, supervised by Dr. Hy Van Luong
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$12,500

Goddard, R. H. Ives

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 24, 2012
Project Title: 
Ives Goddard, Dr. R.H., Washington, DC - To aid preparation of the Papers of William C. Sturtevant for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Goldin, Liliana R.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Florida International U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2009
Project Title: 
Goldin, Dr. Liliana, Florida International U., Miami, FL - To aid '70th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology,' 2010, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

'70th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology'
March 24-28, 2010, Merida, Mexico
Organizers: Liliana R. Goldin (Florida International University)

Support from Wenner-Gren was instrumental in funding two panels composed of eleven Latin American scholars from Guatemala and Argentina. The first panel, entitled 'Human Development, Poverty and Inequality in Guatemala,' was composed of members of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). The second panel, entitled 'Transnational
Transformations, Local Responses: Argentine Anthropology Facing Globalization,' was composed of anthropologists from CONICET (Argentinean Scientific Research Council) as well as the University of Misiones and SUNY Binghamton. Both panels highlighted the excellence in research conducted by Latin American colleagues and showcased the sophisticated ways in which anthropologists engage problem-solving in what according to some measures constitute the margins of the world economy. The conference theme invited the exploration of the effects of globalization on the peoples with whom applied social scientists work resulting in higher levels of exclusion of vulnerability. As a result of the need for increased collaboration in interdisciplinary and transnational teams, the conference encouraged the discussion on the innovative theories and methods employed to make sense out of such complicated and interrelated problems.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,000

Johnson, Amber L

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Truman State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 27, 2012
Project Title: 
Johnson, Amber, Kirksville, MO - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Lewis Binford for archival deposit with the Pickler Memorial Library, Truman State U., Kirksville, MO - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Maranda, Pierre

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Laval, Quebec, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 11, 2010
Project Title: 
Maranda, Dr. Pierre, Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada - To aid preparation of the unpublished research materials of Dr. Elli Kongas Maranda for archival deposit with the Musee de la Civilisation, Quebec, Canada
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$14,835

Rosa, Jonathan Daniel

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rosa, Jonathan Daniel, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation?s Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

JONATHAN DANIEL ROSA, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation's Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. This grant supported twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork carried out between 2008-2009 within a newly created Chicago public high school whose student body was more than 90 percent Mexican and Puerto Rican. Observational, interview, and linguistic data include ongoing observations of more than 90 students, teachers, and administrators in the field site, as well as 40 in-depth interviews with students, teachers, and administrators. These data track: 1) the school's efforts toward transforming students; 2) students' shifting ideas about ethnoracial categories; and 3) the social sites in which distinctions between 'Mexicans' and 'Puerto Ricans' were undermined by emergent 'Latino' sensibilities. This research shows how processes of ethnoracial category making take shape as dialectic counterparts in relation to which language and literacy were understood and practiced in this field site. In particular, the linguistic findings reveal: 1) the profound redefinition of bilingualism as disability and 'languagelessness;' 2) students' strategies for escaping linguistic stigmatization; and 3) the semiotic operations that reduced students' expansive symbolic repertoires to criminality. This analysis of language and ethnoracial identity suggests the broader potential for people to look like a language and sound like a race across cultural contexts.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,960
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