Van Vleet, Krista E.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Bowdoin College
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 10, 2002
Project Title: 
Van Vleet, Dr. Krista E., Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME - To aid research and writing on 'Performing Kinship: Narratives of Intimacy and Embodiments of Power in the Bolivian Andes' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. KRISTA E. VAN VLEET, of Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, received a Richard Carley Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in December 2002 to aid research and writing on 'Performing Kinship: Narratives of Intimacy and Embodiments of Power in the Bolivian Andes.' The research explored how native Andeans negotiate the intimacies and hierarchies of 'relatedness' through everyday practices and stories. People everywhere establish relationships of kinship through everyday interactions. In the Andes, relatedness is created through habitual activities such as sharing food and work. Sullk'atas, Quechua-speaking peasants of the Bolivian highlands, also constitute relatedness through more intensely emotional performances and violent practices, and through stories about them. People gossip about the danger of a sibling's envy, tell tragic tales of young lovers who run away together, recount the physical violence of in-laws, and sorrow for children who are 'no longer Sullk'atas.' Employing an analytical approach that integrates linguistic and cultural anthropology, 'Performing Kinship' investigates not only the meanings that are embedded in the content of stories but also the ways relatedness emerges in the process of telling a story. As they actively participate in the construction of relatedness, Sullk'atas collude with and contest relationships of power asymmetry. Incorporating ethnographic research carried out in Sullk'ata (1995-1996) with new research on the narratives of adolescent Sullk'ata migrants (2003), one of the book's main contributions is to show how relatedness is socially and historically situated and also emergent in everyday performances and interactions of individuals. 'Performing Kinship' investigates the ways relatedness is evoked, performed, and recast by differently positioned social actors, developing critical perspectives on the ways social and emotional relationships are linked to power asymmetries and accounting for the complex and dynamic ways domesticity and transnationality are intertwined in everyday lives.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Grimson, Alejandro

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Inst. de Desarrollo Economico y Social
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 13, 2002
Project Title: 
Grimson, Dr. Alejandro, Instituto de Desarrollo Economico y Social, Buenos Aires, Argentina - To aid research and writing on 'An Historical Ethnography of Nationality on the Argentine-Brazilian Border' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. ALEJANDRO GRIMSON, of the Instituto de Desarrollo Económico y Social in Buenos Aires, Argentina, received a Richard Carley Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in December 2002 to aid research and writing on the historical ethnography of nationality on the Argentine-Brazilian border. In a book exploring the sociogenesis of this border and of national identification in the areas of Paso de los Libres and Uruguayana, Grimson looked particularly at changes in the national identifications of border populations and what those changes meant. By means of historical ethnography, he reconstructed the different points of view on the nation and the frontier that border actors had held at different times. He also analyzed how, in the contemporary sociocultural context, the border was produced, re-created, and reproduced daily by the various social agents who interacted there: small-time smugglers, business organizations, and local, regional, and national government officials. The focal point of the study was transborder practices and the relationships that linked persons or groups located on either side of the border, including commercial relations, transborder marriages, and political networks. An analysis of these links yielded an understanding of the subtle processes by which identity distinctions were produced.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$8,300

Kamat, Vinay R.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
British Columbia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 6, 2011
Project Title: 
Kamat, Dr. Vinay R., U. of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada - To aid research and writing on 'Childhood Malaria and Child Survival in Africa: The Medicalization of Malaria Control in Tanzania' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. VINAY R. KAMAT, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2011 to aid research and writing on 'Childhood Malaria and Child Survival in Africa: The Medicalization of Malaria Control in Tanzania.' Silent Violence is a monograph that demonstrates how the persistence of childhood malaria in Tanzania can be better explained from an anthropological perspective by framing it within a critique of neoliberal global discourses on malaria control and elimination. The monograph explores the persistence of childhood malaria in Tanzania as a form of structural violence that derives from historically situated structured inequality, and the resultant human suffering. It illuminates the processes that are closely tied to structural inequalities, and hegemonic global discourses on malaria control that are increasingly becoming biomedicine-based, technological fixes. Case studies, illness narratives and life histories, highlight not just the social burden of malaria, as mothers who are single/previously married experience it, but the salience of the diversity of experiences within a specific socio-cultural context. The monograph brings people's lived experience with malaria and the local context in which malaria-related social suffering is embedded, to the attention of a global audience, readership, and policy makers, to demonstrate how 'top down' policies are locally experienced. Silent Violence argues that global efforts to deal with malaria have achieved limited success because malaria is increasingly being cast as a bureaucratic, managerial problem and the core of the problem depoliticized.

Publication Credit:

Kamat, Vinay R. 2013. Silent Violence: Global Health, Malaria, and Child Survival in Tanzania. The University of Arizona Press: Tucson.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$40,000

McAllister, Carlota P.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 10, 2004
Project Title: 
McAllister, Dr. Carlota P., York U., Toronto, Canada - To aid research and writing on 'The Good Road: Conscience and Consciousness in a Post revolutionary Guatemalan Indigenous Village' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. CARLOTA P. MCALLISTER, York University, Toronto, Canada, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in December 2004 to aid research and writing on 'The Good Road: Conscience and Consciousness in a Post-Revolutionary Guatemalan Indigenous Village.' Scholars investigating the role played by Maya in Guatemala's socialist insurgency tend to fall into two camps: cultural essentialists, for whom the communitarian Mayan worldview precluded authentic Mayan participation in the modernist political project of revolution; and political essentialists, for whom this project simply represented the objective interests of the Mayan poor. United in their commonsense understanding of revolution as historical progress and Mayan identity as bounded by community, both positions limit the political demands contemporary Maya can articulate. Funding enabled eight months' work on preparing the first draft of a book manuscript, now awarded a contract for publication, which contests these two approaches by exploring the formation and deployment of what villagers in Chupol-a Mayan community that was a stronghold of guerrilla support and then a centre for army counterinsurgency operations-call conciencia (Spanish for both conscience and consciousness). Showing how state and Catholic Church modernizing projects engaged Chupolense notions of the moral life as a 'good road,' the book shows how conciencia became an effective political and moral faculty moving Chupolenses to support the insurgency in the past and governing their debates over the consequences of this decision in the present.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$28,906

Achebe, Nwando

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 25, 2008
Project Title: 
Achebe, Dr. Nwando, Michigan State U., East Lansing, MI - To aid research and writing on 'Gendered Politics in a Changing Space: Colonialism and the Invention of a Female Igbo King' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. NWANDO ACHEBE, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2008 to aid resarch and writing on 'The Female King of Colonial Nigeria: Ahebi Ugbabe.' The resulting book is a full-length critical biography on the only female Warrant Chief and King in all of colonial Nigeria and arguably British Africa. A case study of an extraordinary woman, it reveals much about the shifting bases of gendered power under British indirect rule and the ways in which Igbo women and men negotiated and shaped the colonial environment. The biography also encourages new ways of interpreting African lives beyond the received categories of analysis by advancing critical perspectives on women, gender, and sex. It also challenges presumptions of homogeneity within the category of 'woman,' 'prostitute,' and 'slave,' and offers new theories that recognize African concepts such as female king, female husband, autonomous sex worker, and 'wife of deity.' There is no comparative biography on gender and power in Igboland. The life of this exceptional female king, Ahebi Ugbabe, therefore contributes to knowledge by illuminating one [wo]man's agency in remapping the terrain of 'traditional' and colonial gendered politics in her district.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Petryna, Adriana

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New School U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Petryna, Dr. Adriana, The New School U., New York, NY - To aid research and writing on 'Pharmaceutical Testing and Evidence Making: An Ethnography of the Globalized Clinical Trial' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. ADRIANA PETRYNA, The New School University, New York, New York, recieved a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2006 to aid research and writing on 'Pharmaceutical Testing and Evidence Making: An Ethnography of the Globalized Clinical Trial.' Accelerated therapeutic innovation and massive pharmaceutical sales are driving an unprecedented worldwide search for human test subjects. When Experiments Travel:Clinical Trials and the Global Search for Human Subjects (Princeton University Press, in press) takes the reader deep into the clinical research enterprise. It enters the perspectives of multiple actors with divergent standpoints and stakes, illuminating the benefits and risks that accompany global clinical trials. Based on interviews with corporate scientists and executives, the book charts the evolution of the clinical research industry in the United States and probes the regulatory and logistical challenges faced by this outsourced venture. Concerned with scientific integrity and human safety, the book traces the offshoring of clinical trials and their aftermath in middle and low-income countries where it also engages the work of trial coordinators, academic scientists, and regulators. When Experiments Travel shows how private-sector research thrives on public institutions and is integrated as health care for the poor, how ethics is variable, and how the success of trials can be engineered and harms underestimated. As the world becomes a series of interlocking laboratories, data-producing sites, and drug markets, better systems of protection, accountability, and benefit-sharing are in order. The book holds vital lessons for social scientists, citizens, and policy makers concerned with the future of global medicine and the changing infrastructures of our lives.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$39,760

Boric, Dusan

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cardiff U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 8, 2009
Project Title: 
Boric, Dr. Dusan, U. of Cardiff, Cardiff, United Kingdom - To aid research and writing on 'Whirlpools' Harvesters: Adaptations and Transformations of Mesolithic Foragers in the Danube Gorges' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. DUSAN BORIC, University of Cardiff, Cardiff, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in October 2009, to aid research and writing on 'Whirlpools' Harvesters: Adaptations and Transformations of Mesolithic Foragers in the Danube Gorges.' This book project will be published by the Oxford University Press. The funding made possible the updating and synthesizing of various strands of archaeological evidence now available from the Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in the Danube Gorges of the north-central Balkans. This case study presents the best data for the understanding of Early Holocene adaptations of forager societies of temperate southeast Europe and provides an unprecedented example for the reconstruction of Mesolithic-Neolithic transformations in the whole of Old World Prehistory. Combining re-analyses of old collections and excavation archives, recent archaeometric analyses and evidence from new excavations, the author pieces together a complex picture of diachronic changes affecting these small-scale societies in this particular region of the Balkans over several millennia (c. 13,000-5500 BC). While of immediate relevance for Mesolithic and Neolithic studies in Europe, this research has a cross-cultural perspective in shedding light on the nature and mechanisms of culture changes in forager communities worldwide. It is intended that the resulting book will be published in 2012.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Shah, Alpa

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Goldsmiths College
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 18, 2006
Project Title: 
Shah, Dr. Alpa, Goldsmiths College, London, UK - To aid research and writing on 'In the Shadows of the State: Indigenous Politics in Jharkhand, India' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. ALPA SHAH, Goldsmiths College, London, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in October 2006 to aid research and writing on 'In the Shadows of the State: Indigenous Politics in Jharkhand, India.' The fellowship resulted in the completion of a monograph which draws on extensive anthropological research in Jharkhand, India, to explore how well-meaning transnational indigenous rights and development discourses can misrepresent and further marginalize people they claim to speak for. The book follows the lives and experiences of adivasis in rural Jharkhand to analyze common claims made at a global level on behalf of indigenous populations. These include: the examination of the promotion of special forms of indigenous governance; the way development takes shape in the name of the poorest; the 'eco-incarceration' of indigenous people through arguments about their love for, and worship of, nature as well as their attachment to their land; and claims to their harboring revolutionary potential. The book argues that there is a 'dark side of indigeneity' that it is well worth highlighting to those who urge scholars to shelve critical scholarship for fear it may weaken the advocacy of promoters of indigenous rights and development. The 'dark side of indigeneity' may show that the local appropriation and experiences of global discourses of indigeneity can maintain a class system that further marginalizes the poorest.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$32,421

Evans, Damian Harold

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Sydney, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 4, 2011
Project Title: 
Evans, Dr. Damian Harold, U. of Sydney, Sydney, Australia - To aid research and writing on 'Redefining Angkor: The Landscape Archaeology of Southeast Asia's Great 'Hydraulic City'' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary Abstract: This project involves the development and publication of a monograph tentatively titled 'Redefining Angkor: The landscape archaeology of Southeast Asia's great 'Hydraulic City''. For the past decade the author has been responsible for archaeological mapping at the medieval city of Angkor, in Cambodia, using field surveys and the analysis of a diverse range of remote sensing datasets. The work has revealed the existence of an extended settlement complex stretching far beyond the main temples, as well as a vast and intricate water management system. The emergence of a comprehensive picture of settlement structure at Angkor creates the opportunity to rigorously evaluate competing theories of Angkor's subsistence, growth and decline for the first time. The implications of the new data for the 'hydraulic city' hypothesis, in which the collapse of the water control system is held to be a cause of Angkor's decline, are covered in detail. Alternative interpretations are considered, and the mapping activities are located within the overall history of archaeological mapping and remote sensing at Angkor. The work will develop new perspectives on the nature of early urban centres in Southeast Asia, which have traditionally been considered to be neatly defined spaces that developed from the circular moated sites of prehistory to the walled cities of the medieval era. In fact, the morphology of the dispersed, low-density urban complexes of that period, of which Angkor is the largest, suggest a clear affinity with the modern conurbations of the late twentieth century in which a peri-urban fringe extends far beyond the well-defined urban core.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Venkatesan, Soumhya

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cambridge, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 10, 2002
Project Title: 
Venkatesan, Dr. Soumhya, U. of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK - To aid research and writing on 'Crafting Discourse: Mat Weaving in Pattamadai, South India' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. SOUMHYA VENKATESAN, of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England, was awarded a Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship in December 2002 to aid research and writing on mat weaving and the discourse surrounding the craft in Pattamadai, India. From January 2003 to January 2004, Venkatesan conducted research in South India among Muslim mat weavers, exploring issues relating to Islam and the craft object. She wrote up the results of the research in a manuscript for publication as a monograph, with the working title Transformative Words: 'Craft,' 'Development,' and the Worlds of Indian Artists. Aspects of the research were also to be published in a paper entitled 'Making Gifts Matter,' in a volume edited by Ssorin-Chaikov and Sosnina.

Publication Credits:

Venkatesan, Soumhya. 2006. Shifting Balances in a 'Craft Community:' The Mat Weavers of Pattamdai, South India. Contributions to Indian Sociology 40(1):63-89.

Venkatesan, Soumhya. 2009. Craft Matters: Artisans, Development and the Indian Nation. Orient Black Swan: New Delhi.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$14,456
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