Bellwood, Peter S.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 23, 2009
Project Title: 
Bellwood, Dr. Peter Stafford, Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid '19th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association,' 2009, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences, Hanoi, in collaboration with Dr. Giang Hai Nguyen

'The 19th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association'
November 29-December 5, 2009, Vietnam Institute of Archaeology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Organizers: Peter Bellwood (Australian National University) and Giang Hai Nguyen (Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences)

A total of 650 people attended the conference, representing about 30 countries in the Indo- Pacific region, as well as Europe and North America. Forty-nine individual sessions were held concurrently in five seminar rooms, with over 400 papers were presented. The conference attracted many younger students from Indo-Pacific countries who were able to meet and discuss their research with peers from countries outside the region. A full program and other details can be found at http://arts.anu.edu.au/arcworld/ippa/19thcongress.htm. The sessions were grouped into four major themes: 1) Pleistocene culture and evolution; 2) the archaeological record during the Holocene (geographical or chronological foci); 3) thematic or disciplinary (comparative, social, biological, environmental) foci; and 4) themes related to heritage management, education, and the development of archaeology as a discipline. Convenors have been asked to collect papers for editing, refereeing and publication in the Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Fiskesjo, N. Magnus G.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cornell U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 17, 2011
Project Title: 
Fiskesjo, Dr. N. Magnus G., Cornell U., Ithaca, NY - To aid workshop on 'Rice and Language across Asia: Crops, Movement, and Social Change,' 2011, Cornell U., in collaboration with Dr. John B. Whitman

Preliminary abstract: The goal of this workshop is to examine the beginnings and spread of rice agriculture in early Asia, in light of the rapidly growing advances in human genetics on human migrations; linguistic studies of language diversification; plant genetics; and archaeological research on agricultural beginnings in the region. The workshop will focus on the complex relationship between crops, language and sociocultural developments in early South, Southeast, and East Asia, which have not previously been discussed together on this scale. We pay special attention to the role of rice, as a highly significant, dominant crop in early agricultural transformations and expansions across Asia, and to how human populations were impacted and societies changed as a result of the introduction and development of rice farming. Collaborative work by the workshop organizers reveals significant crossdisciplinary differences in the understanding of such notions as 'diffusion' and 'population,' and the critical resources of anthropology will play a central role in mediating these differences and establishing a common ground for future research. The workshop will debate and aim to establish conceptual foundations for interdisciplinary communications and comparative discussion between the different scholarly fields involved -- anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and genetics

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Lewis, Laura Victoria

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2013
Project Title: 
Lewis, Laura Victoria, U. of Oxford, Oxford, UK - To aid research on 'Small Tools, Big Questions: A Comparison of the Earliest Microlithic Technologies in Two Sub-Continents,' supervised by Dr. Michael Petraglia

Preliminary abstract: Microlith production is a highly distinctive and significant stone tool technology. Systematic production of microliths began in different regions at different times, and in different social and environmental settings. However, microlithic industries have tended to be treated as a monolithic entity, without taking into account the variety of different methods of production and use. Variation within and between assemblages can reveal much about the various reasons why particular microlithic forms were selected as beneficial technological adaptations in particular regions, and the manufacturing choices that people made in order to produce their desired tools. This research will be the first to directly and quantitatively examine changes in microlithic technology over both space and time in two of the earliest microlithic industries in the world -- the Howiesons Poort of southern Africa and the Late Palaeolithic of South Asia.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$2,250

Schepartz, Lynne A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cincinnati, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 30, 2001
Project Title: 
Schepartz, Dr. Lynne A., U. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH - To aid conference on Asia and the Middle Pleistocene in global perspective, 2001, East-West Center, Manoa, Hawaii, in collaboration with Dr. Sari Miller-Antonio
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$9,000

Bellwood, Peter S.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 28, 2002
Project Title: 
Bellwood, Dr. Peter S., Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid 17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, 2002, Academia Sinica Campus, Nankang, Taipei, in collaboration with Dr. Cheng-hwa Tsang

'17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association,' September 9-15, 2002 , Academia Sinica in Taipei, Taiwan -- Organizers: Dr. Peter Bellwood, Australian National University, and Dr. Tsang Cheng-Hwa, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica. 276 papers were given in a total of 30 sessions, with themes ranging from the earliest human settlement of Asia, through early farmers and civilizations, to issues related to the preservation of cultural and archaeological heritage at the present day. The delegates represented 30 countries spread through Europe (including Russia), South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, Australasia and North America. Funding was used to support the attendance of 30 delegates from Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Russia, Sri Lanka and Thailand, out of a total of 80 funded delegates from developing countries. The publications from the conference will appear over the next few years in several issues of the Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Associat

Publication Credit:

Bellwood, Peter, Ben Marwick, and Richard Pearson (eds.) 2007. Proceedings of the 17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association. Taipei, Taiwan: 9 to 15 September 2002.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Flad, Rowan K.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 22, 2008
Project Title: 
Flad, Dr. Rowan K., Harvard U., Cambridge, MA; and Li, Dr. Shuicheng, Peking U., Beijing, P.R. China - To aid collaborative research on 'Changing Landscape and Settlement Patterns during the Rise of Complexity in the Chengdu Plain, Sichuan, China'

DR. ROWAN K. FLAD, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and DR. SHUICHENG LI, Peking University, Beijing, P.R. China, were awarded an International Collaborative Research Grant in May 2008, to aid collaborative research on 'Changing Landscape and Settlement Patterns during the Rise of Complexity in the Chengdu Plain, Sichuan, China.' During the 2008-10 field seasons, the Chengdu Plain Archaeological Survey conducted large-scale surface survey, systematic augering, geomorphological testing, and geophysical prospection in a 314 km-square area of the Chengdu Plain around the site of Gucheng, to investigate the changing patterns of settlement in this region during the Late Neolithic and Bronze Age periods. Large numbers of previously unknown sites were identified across the region. Throughout the time periods being investigated, sites are located consistently on landforms overlooking hydrological channels as reconstructed by the geomorphological work. Geophysical prospection identified archaeological features from different time periods, some of which were tested to extract archaeobotanical materials. The survey also identified broad changes in orientation of sites over time that suggest regional processes reorganized the pattern of human settlements --from one that was locally oriented to one that was partly tied into macro-regional processes -- that involved the establishment of a major political center in the area of the modern city of Chengdu. The data are integrated using a digital GIS database, and a workshop on GIS development and analysis for Chinese archaeologists was also funded by the grant. Ongoing research will continue to analyze the data collected and explore these preliminary patterns.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$30,275

Li, Min

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 25, 2005
Project Title: 
Li, Min, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Conquest, Concord, and Consumption: Becoming Shang in East China,' supervised by Dr. Carla M. Sinopli

MIN LI, then a student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, received funding in January 2005 to aid research on 'Conquest, Concord, and Consumption: Becoming Shang in East China,' supervised by Dr. Carla M. Sinopli. The grantee's archaeological research at the site of Daxinzhuang (30 ha) investigated the social and cultural transformations during the mid and late Shang period in the Jinan region. Recent excavations at this important mid Shang settlement in eastern China revealed a rapid expansion of the Shang state into this culturally diverse region. Stylistic and technological differences in material culture reveal that changes in social relations resulting from Shang conquest were probably construed and demarcated along existing lines of cultural difference in the community. With a dissertation fieldwork grant (7261) from the Wenner-Gren Foundation, Li Min conducted excavation at the site in collaboration with archaeologists from the Shandong University and the Jinan City Institute of Archaeology. The excavation uncovered a dozen large pit features filled with residential debris from the Mid-Shang period residents, as well as evidence for human and animal sacrifice resulting from ritual activities. The excavation was followed by analysis of ceramics and animal bones from context of food consumption and ritual activities. As animals had symbolic and economic importance in the Shang world, the research on patterned variation animal remains in diverse archaeological context informs on status difference, economic condition, and cultural identity at the local society.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$17,000

Schmaus, Tekla McCarthy

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Indiana U., Bloomington
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 10, 2012
Project Title: 
Schmaus, Tekla McCarthy, Indiana U., Bloomington, IN - To aid research on 'Seasonal Mobility and Social Structure in Bronze and Iron Age Semirech'ye, Kazakhstan,' supervised by Dr. K. Anne Pyburn

TEKLA MCCARTHY SCHMAUS, then a student at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, was awarded a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'Seasonal Mobility and Social Structure in Bronze and Iron Age Semirech'ye, Kazakhstan,' supervised by Dr. K. Anne Pyburn. The Bronze Age in central Eurasia is beginning to be understood as a time in which nomadic groups took part in complex social interactions, dictated in part by the seasonal locations of their settlements. In some parts of Semirech 'ye, Kazakhstan, the transition to the Iron Age was marked by increased reliance on agricultural goods and potentially by increased sedentism. It has been hypothesized that this change is related to the development of the hierarchical societies of the Saka and Wusun confederacies. Two settlements in the region, Begash and Tasbas, have continuous occupation histories throughout the Bronze and Iron Ages. In-depth analysis of the faunal remains from these settlements will allow for a better understanding of people's mobility patterns and the way those patterns were related to changes in the broader social and political structure. In addition, the Iron Age settlement of Tuzusai provides additional information about the range of variation in Iron Age lifeways. Studying annular rings in tooth cementum from all three settlements gives precise information about the seasons in which specific settlements were occupied, which in turn will provide new data on nomadic practices in prehistory.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$11,140

Bridges, Elizabeth Jane

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2008
Project Title: 
Bridges, Elizabeth Jane, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Regional Political Authority Under the Vijayanagara Empire: Archaeology of the Keladi-Ikkeri Nayakas,' supervised by Dr. Carla M. Sinopoli

ELIZABETH BRIDGES, then a student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, received a grant in April 2008, to aid research on 'Regional Political Authority Under the Vijayanagara Empire: Archaeology of the Keladi-Ikkeri Nayakas,' supervised by Dr. Carla M. Sinopoli. This project investigated the Keladi-Ikkeri Nayakas, regional kings who ruled under the Vijayanagara Empire from 1500 to 1614 and as independent sovereigns from 1614 to 1763. This project is based on archaeological survey at the first and second capitals of the Nayaka kings, occupied in the imperial and early independent periods. Archaeological fieldwork was conducted during three seasons between 2007 and 2009; Wenner-Gren funding supported the completion of fieldwork in the final season and subsequent analysis of artifacts. Archaeological fieldwork was conducted at the sites of Keladi and Ikkeri in Shimoga District, Karnataka State, India. A full-coverage survey over 18 square kilometers comprising the former urban cores at both sites located and documented a total of 238 sites. Support also funded archival research on historical sources held in the British Library; the documents examined included unpublished translations of relevant literature, and early colonial survey and census data relevant to establishing site chronology. These and other lines of evidence indicate that while the empire was instrumental in supporting the development of Nayaka power, regional rulers were functionally highly autonomous. This picture represents a contrast to many other archaeologically known empires whose processes of regional integration relied on relations of domination and resistance.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$17,396

Fogelin, Lars Edward

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Fogelin, Dr. Lars Edward, U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid research and writing on 'An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. LARS E. FOGELIN, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2012 to aid research and writing on 'An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism.' Support assisted the completion of the final six chapters of a comprehensive survey of Indian Buddhism, from its origins in c. 500 BCE through its decline in mainland South Asia by c. 1400 CE. This book provides a markedly new perspective on Buddhist history. Specifically, it draws upon archaeological remains, architecture, iconography and epigraphy (inscriptions) to uncover the quotidian concerns and practices of Buddhist monks and their lay adherents -- concerns and practices often obscured in studies of Buddhism premised largely, if not exclusively, on doctrinal and theological texts. Throughout the book a fundamental disjuncture between the solitary, meditative aspects of Buddhism and the need to forge and maintain a coherent community of Buddhists is examined. An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism will also serve as an exemplar for the anthropological study of long-term religious change. During the period supported by the fellowship, the draft of the manuscript was completed, with delivery to Oxford University Press expected in December 2013.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$40,000
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