Jopela, Albino Pereira de Jesus

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Witwatersrand, U. of
Status: 
Active Fellowship
Approve Date: 
January 14, 2014
Project Title: 
Jopela, Albino, U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa - To aid training in archaeology at U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, supervised by Dr. Benjamin Smith
Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$16,040

Jopela, Albino Pereira de Jesus

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Witwatersrand, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
January 12, 2012
Project Title: 
Jopela, Albino, U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa - To aid training in archaeology at U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, supervised by Dr. Benjamin Smith
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,856

Jopela, Albino Pereira de Jesus

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Witwatersrand, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
January 16, 2013
Project Title: 
Jopela, Albino, U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa - To aid training in archaeology at U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, supervised by Dr. Benjamin Smith
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$16,592

Jillani, Ngalla E.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National Museums of Kenya
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 14, 2006
Project Title: 
Jillani, Mr. Ngalla Edward, National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya - To aid conference on 'Towards Understanding Palaeoenvironment during the First 'Out of Africa,' ' 2006, National Museums, in collaboration with Dr. Fredrick Kyala Manthi

Geo-environmental conditions may have triggered migrations at various times in the last 3 million years ago. Physical human factors and the environment can also trigger movement both at local and continental scale. Ecology and behaviour of a dispersing species becomes more variable as novel environments are settled and no close competitors are encountered. Adaptability, key factor to an organism's ability to endure change, thrive and spread to new environments rather than climatic shift and expansion of grasslands may explain success of early Homo in its novel environments.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Janzen, Anneke

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Cruz, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 23, 2012
Project Title: 
Janzen, Anneke, U. of California, Santa Cruz, CA - To aid research on 'Mobility and Herd Management among Early Pastoralists in East Africa,' supervised by Dr. Diane Gifford-Gonzalez

Preliminary abstract: African pastoralism is unique in that it developed earlier than farming, and spread throughout the continent, appearing in East Africa around 3000 years ago and continuing to adapt to changes in the social and ecological landscape until the present. The proposed project examines mobility and herd management strategies of early pastoralists in East Africa. Stable isotope analysis of carbon, oxygen, and strontium, will provide detailed information about seasonal movements across the landscape as well as livestock exchange.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$6,727

Isaac, A. Barbara

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 24, 2001
Project Title: 
Isaac, A. Barbara, Cambridge, MA - To aid preparation of personal research materials of Glynn Isaac for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$8,600

Hildebrand, Elisabeth A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Stony Brook, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 9, 2008
Project Title: 
Hildebrand, Dr. Elisabeth, Stony Brook U., NY - To aid workshop on 'From Fishers to Herders: Holocene Subsistence Intensification in the Turkana Basin,' 2008, East Hampton, NY, in collaboration with Dr. Richard Leakey

'From Fishers to Herders: Holocene Subsistence Intensification in the Turkana Basin'
October 13-18, 2009, East Hampton, New York
Organizers: Elisabeth Hildebrand and Richard Leakey (Stony Brook University)

The sixth in a series of Human Evolution Workshops organized by the Turkana Basin Institute and Stony Brook University, this meeting brought together 20 scholars (including graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and senior scholars) from Kenya, Ethiopia, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Hildebrand, Elisabeth A.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 4, 2004
Project Title: 
Hildebrand, Dr. Elisabeth A., Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid research on 'The Origins of Enset Cultivation: Archaeological Excavations in Southwest Ethiopia,'

DR. ELISABETH ANNE HILDEBRAND, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, received funding in October 2004 to investigate 'The Origins of Enset Cultivation: Archaeological Excavations in Southwest Ethiopia.' From 2004-2006, Hildebrand and colleagues did seven months of survey and excavation of rockshelters in Kafa. Survey documented 25 rockshelters, nine of which were subjected to test excavations. Two rockshelters, Kumali and Koka, have intact sediments of substantial depth with artifacts throughout.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Henshilwood, Christopher S.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Bergen, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 18, 2006
Project Title: 
Henshilwood, Dr. Christopher, U. of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; and Dr. Francesco d'Errico, U. de Bordeaux 1, Talence, France - To aid collaborative research on use of Nassarius kraussianus shells as ornamentation in southern Africa Middle Stone Age

DR. CHRISTOPHER HENSHILWOOD, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, and DR. FRANCESCO D'ERRICO, Université de Bordeaux 1, Talence, France, received an International Collaborative Research Grant in October 2006, to aid collaborative research on the use of Nassarius kraussianus shells as ornamentation in southern Africa Middle Stone Age. The aim of this project was to investigate the human use of Nassarius kraussianus (Nk), as ornamentation during the Middle Stone Age and the Later Stone Age in southern Africa.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$28,711

Haws, Jonathan Adam

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Louisville, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Haws, Dr. Jonathan Adams, U. of Louisville, Louisville, KY - To aid research on 'Middle Stone Age Archaeology and Modern Human Origins Research in Southern Mozambique'

DR. JONATHAN A. HAWS, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, was awarded funding in April 2012 to aid research on 'Middle Stone Age Archaeology and Modern Human Origins Research in Southern Mozambique.' In 2012, the project conducted a reconnaissance survey of the Maputaland region of Mozambique to investigate the origins of modern human behavior. As part of this work, the team documented new Middle Stone Age sites and collected samples to establish age control for the study of Quaternary landscapes in the region.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$9,763
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