Stump, Daryl

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
York U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 15, 2010
Project Title: 
Stump, Dr. Daryl, U. of York, York, United Kingdom - To aid research on 'The Long-term History of Indigenous Agriculture and Conservation Practices in Konso, Ethiopia'

Preliminary abstract: The twin concepts of sustainability and conservation that are so pivotal within current debates regarding economic development and biodiversity protection both contain an inherent temporal dimension, since both refer to the need to balance short-term gains with long-term resource maintenance. This point is not lost on proponents of resilience theory or advocates of development based on â??indigenous knowledgeâ??, some of whom have argued for the necessity of including an archaeological, historical or palaeoenvironmental component within development project design. Although this suggests a renewed contemporary relevance for several anthropological sub-disciplines, it also raises theoretical and methodological concerns regarding archaeological imperatives for â??heritageâ?? preservation, questions of local ownership, and long-standing debates about impartiality and political engagement. Moreover, it also prompts the fundamental question as to whether anthropology can truly claim to see and translate indigenous knowledge in the recent and distant past. The project outlined here is exploring these issues through a combination of archaeological, geoarchaeological, archival and interview-based research on the complex agro-ecological system at Konso, southwest Ethiopia; a system which is thought at present to have originally developed some 500 years ago, and has been described as comprising one of a select few 'lessons from the past' by a United Nations report on land conservation and rehabilitation in Africa (FAO 1990). The study aims to place the modern Konso agricultural system within its long-term context and to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the various ways in which anthropological research can engage with developmental and conservationist narratives.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$23,370

Sahle Chemere, Yonatan

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cape Town, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
July 24, 2012
Project Title: 
Chemere, Yonatan Sahle, Arba Minch U., Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - To aid dissertation write up in archaeology at U. of Cape Town, South Africa, supervised by Dr. David R. Braun
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$17,000

Williams, Erin Marie Shepard

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
George Washington U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2009
Project Title: 
Williams, Erin Marie Shepard, George Washington U., Washington, DC - To aid research on 'Influences of Material Properties and Biomechanics on Stone Tool Production,' supervised by Dr. Alison S. Brooks

ERIN MARIE SHEPARD WILLIAMS, then a student at George Washington University, Washington, DC, was awarded funding in April 2009, to aid research on 'Influences of Material Properties and Biomechanics on Stone Tool Production,' supervised by Dr. Alison S. Brooks. Later Homo possesses a derived thumb that is robust and long relative to the other digits, with enhanced musculature compared to extant apes and early hominins. Researchers have hypothesized that this anatomy was selected in part to withstand high forces acting on the thumb during stone tool production. Previous studies indirectly support this hypothesis; however, direct data on loads experienced during stone tool production and their distribution across the hand are lacking. Using a dynamic pressure sensor system and 3-D motion capture technology, manual forces and pressures were collected from six experienced knappers replicating Oldowan tools. Knappers used hammerstones requiring a 3-jaw chuck grip. Peak and strike forces and pressures and impulse and pressure-time integrals were consistently significantly greater on the 2nd and/or 3rd digits compared to the 1st across all subjects. Kinematics data revealed that this distribution pattern was not consistently present during up-swing, however it was established during the down-swing pre-strike phase and continued through swing termination. These results do not support the hypothesis that loads experienced during stone tool production are significantly higher on the thumb compared to the other digit, calling into question hypotheses linking modern human thumb anatomy specifically to stone tool production load resistance.

Publication credit:

Williams, Erin Marie, Adam D. Gordon, and Brian G. Richmond. 2012. Hand Pressure Distribution during Oldowan Stone Tool Production. Journal of Human Evolution 62(4):520-532.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$10,500

Haradon, Catherine Marie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
George Washington U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2008
Project Title: 
Haradon, Catherine Marie, George Washington U., Washington, DC - To aid research on 'Environmental and Faunal Context of the Acheulean to MSA Transition in Africa,' supervised by Dr. Richard Potts

CATHERINE HARADON, then a student at George Washington University, Washington, DC, received funding in April 2008 to aid research on 'Environmental and Faunal Context of the Acheulean to MSA Transition in Africa,' supervised by Dr. Richard Potts. This research examines environmental change as a factor in the transition between the Acheulean and Middle Stone Age (MSA) archaeological industries of Africa during the Middle Pleistocene (780-130 ka). Faunal assemblages from two late Acheulean and transitional/early MSA sites (Olorgesailie, Kenya, and Cave of Hearths, South Africa) are used as proxies for environmental change. Species identifications provide broad ecological indicators, and measurements of teeth and bones contribute information on the diet of the animals and the type of vegetation they inhabited. Preliminary results suggest that the Acheuelan fauna at the Cave of Hearths was dominated by large-bodied, grassland-adapted taxa. The MSA fauna consists of smaller-bodied taxa that were adapted to a wider range of environments. This resembles the East African pattern of turnover from large-bodied grazers replaced by smaller-bodied, more variably adapted taxa around the time that modern human behaviors began to emerge on the African continent. Continuing research will investigate paleo-ecological similarities between East and South Africa at this time through additional analyses of the Cave of Hearths fauna; analysis and comparison of the Olorgesailie faunal assemblages; and analysis of metric data from both sites, including feeding types, body sizes, and habitat indicators.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$7,208

Logan, Amanda Lee

Grant Type: 
Engaged Anthropology Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Northwestern U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 24, 2014
Project Title: 
Logan, Dr, Amanda, Northwestern U., Evanston, IL - To aid engaged activities on 'Histories of Food, Home, and Field: Celebrating Women's Knowledge and Sustainable Choices in Banda, Ghana,' 2014, Banda, Ghana

Preliminary abstract: This Engagement project involves the presentation of long-term histories of food, home, and field to the community of Banda, Ghana. An event held at the Banda Cultural Centre will involve exhibition and interpretation of three displays along with an Olden Times Food Fair. The central goals are to emphasize women's knowledge, destigmatize practices associated with poverty, and promote local histories of sustainable choices in farming and house construction. Previous research sponsored by a Wenner-Gren Dissertation Fieldwork grant combined ethnoarchaeological and archaeological data to trace shifts in food, farming, and domestic architecture in the Banda region over the last millennium. Ethnoarchaeological research documented the use of edible wild plants during times of food shortage, but this ethnobotanical knowledge is being rapidly lost. Likewise there have been shifts in domestic architecture towards expensive concrete block buildings, and a devaluation of cheaper, longer lasting local architectural forms. Archaeological data show that Banda villagers were able to weather a severe, centuries-long drought in the 15th-17th centuries, with chronic food insecurity emerging only recently. These three results will be recounted to broaden local concepts of history to include women's knowledge, and explore how the past can inform the present, particularly in terms of sustainability.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$5,000

Mosothwane, Morongwa N.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Witwatersrand, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 4, 2005
Project Title: 
Mosothwane, Morongwa N., U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa - To aid research on 'Molecular Tracing of Early Farmers Diets in Eastern Botswana,' supervised by Dr. Karim Sadr & Dr. Judith C. Sealy

MORONGWA NANCY MOSOTHWANE, then a student at University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, received funding in November 2005 to aid research on 'Molecular Tracing of Early Farmers Diets in Eastern Botswana,' supervised by Dr. Karim Sadr and Dr. Judith C. Sealy. The study was intended to identify farmers and foragers during the Early Iron Age (EIA) in Botswana through the use of stable isotope analysis. The areas were selected as they are known to have been frontiers of contact between foragers and farmers. The aim was to determine whether there were foragers buried on farmers' settlements or vise versa and to identify those individuals who had shifted from one of subsistance to the other over a long period. The human samples came from EIA settlements in the Toutswe area, Tsodilo Hills and Okavango River. Toutswe samples were derived from Kgaswe B55 (n=17), Bonwapitse (n=3), Taukome (n=5) and Thatswane (n=6), Bosutswe (n=13) and Toutswemogala (n=28) and others (n=4). At the Tsodilo Hills, two sites are Divuyu (n=1) and N!oma (n=3). Xaro (n=2), is along the Okavango River. Thus, 76 humans were selected for stable isotope analysis. Animal samples from archaeological and modern context were analysed to provide reference standards for the interpretation of human isotope values. They included domestic species like cattle, sheep/goats, and a dog as well as wild animals: zebra, hare, tortoise, and steenbok. According to results, EIA farmers in the Toutswe and the Tsodilo Hills areas relied on domestic C4 crops (sorghum and millet), which they supplemented with C3 plants. The C3 component was derived from a combination of domestic and wild plants. At N!oma the two individuals showed isotopic evidence for having been a foragers who later shifted to a farming mode of subsistence. It is possible that the Xaro individuals exploited freshwater fish from the nearby Okavango River but they were farmers.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$21,000

Richard, Francois G.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Syracuse U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 22, 2003
Project Title: 
Richard, Francois G., Syracuse U., Syracuse, NY - To aid research on 'Landscapes of Complexity: An Archaeological Study of Sociopolitical Change in Siin (Senegal), AD 1000-1900,' supervised by Dr. Christopher R. DeCorse

FRANCOIS G. RICHARD, while a student at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York, received funding in January 2003 to aid archaeological research on sociopolitical change in Siin (Senegal) from 1000 to 1900 c.e., under the supervision of Dr. Christopher R. DeCorse. Richard examined long-term changes in political complexity and social landscapes in Siin through the combined lenses of archaeology, historical documents, and oral traditions. This region was a vibrant frontier, intimately connected to Senegambia's turbulent political economy and history of migrations, cultural encounters, and oscillations between centralized and dispersed social organization. To capture local expressions of these social processes, Richard conducted a systematic survey of three zones associated with state formation, identifying more than 180 sites ranging from late Neolithic to recent historic occupations. Limited subsurface testing was done at seven sites. The archaeological work was complemented by an examination of archives to gain insights into regional dynamics during the historic period. Collected surface and excavated materials were expected to enable Richard to (1) create a regional baseline of information on site distribution, settlement layout, subsistence economy, long-distance trade, and technology; (2) establish a chronological framework for regional sites; (3) document Siin's sociopolitical trajectories through village dynamics and settlement networks; and (4) examine variations in settlement patterns and artifact assemblages in order to understand how local societies responded to Senegambia's changing political economy.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$18,375

Beyin, Amanuel Yosief

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Stony Brook, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 10, 2006
Project Title: 
Beyin, Amanuel Yosief, State U. of New York, Stony Brook, NY - To aid 'Paleolithic Investigation on the Red Sea Coast of Eritrea,' supervised by Dr. John J. Shea

Publication Credits:

Beyin, Amanuel. 2009. Late Stone Age Shell Middens on the Red Coast of Eritrea. Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 4:108-124.

Beyin, Amanuel. 2010. Use-wear analysis of obsidian artifacts from Later Stone Age shell midden sites on the Red Sea Coast of Eritrea, with experimental results. Journal of Archaeological Science 37: 1543-1556.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$22,700

Susino, George James

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Witwatersrand, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 20, 2006
Project Title: 
Susino, George James, U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa - To aid research on 'Optical Dating of Quartz Microdebitage from Archaeological Deposits of Sibudu Cave, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa'

DR. GEORGE JAMES SUSINO, then a student at University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, was awarded funding in October 2006 to aid research on 'Optical Dating of Quartz Microdebitage from Archaeological Deposits of Sibudu Cave, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.' This research addresses several key problems related to the understanding of archaeological site formation processes. In recent years, the reliance on sedimentary layers for chronological analysis of archaeological sites has been problematic. Site deposit disturbance is difficult to quantify, and archaeology has adopted several strategies for dating events within the stratigraphy. The most common is to date the terminus post quem, or the location of the lowest artefact (regardless of the movement of the material in the deposit). This research redresses these methodological problems by direct dating of remnant artefactual material (quartz microdebitage) and sedimentary quartz separately with optical dating techniques as to discern differences in age between the sedimentary and artefactual material. The OSL chronologies are then correlated with the extensive age determination achieved by other dating techniques (Radiocarbon and OSL on sediments). The Sibudu Cave site was selected primarily for the ready availability of sediment samples collected previously for optical dating and for the site importance for the understanding of changes within lithic technology from Early Stone Age to Late Stone Age. This research will apply a rigorous test for the validity of the chronology of lithic typologies at Sibudu Cave, and as a test of direct dating of artefactual material as opposed to the dating of sedimentary layers.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$10,980

Sahle Chemere, Yonatan

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cape Town, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
July 25, 2011
Project Title: 
Chemere, Yonatan Sahle, Arba Minch U., Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - To aid training in archaeology at U. of Cape Town, South Africa, supervised by Dr. David R. Braun
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$17,500
Syndicate content